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A tale of desperation and the lengths we’ll go to find satisfaction, Eight Gigabytes of Hardcore Pornography is Australian theatre-maker Declan Greene's wincingly hilarious and awkwardly recognisable portrait of contemporary life crisis.

Loft, Q Theatre, Auckland

From the Promo:

He’s addicted to porn.  She’s addicted to spending.  She’s self-conscious about her breasts.  And so is he. 

Attempting to fill the void of loneliness, a man and a woman meet online in search of something better.  Something different.  But what happens when the grass on the other side turns out to be just as shit as the patch you’ve already got?

A tale of desperation and the lengths we’ll go to find satisfaction, Australian theatre-maker Declan Greene uses his signature wit to create a wincingly hilarious and awkwardly recognisable portrait of contemporary life crisis.

Already an accomplished actor and director, this will be Laurel Devenie’s directorial debut for Silo.

 

Playwright:     Declan Greene

Director:         Laurel Devenie

Performance:  Bronwyn Bradley and Mark Wright

Design:          Dan Williams, Paul McLaney, and Jane Hakaraia

Produced by:  Silo Theatre

Franciska's Review:

This was my first time in Q Theatre's Loft ~ located above the main theatre space.  The smaller capacity provided for a more intimate setting ~ drawing the audience further into the story.  Unfortunately, it wasn't clear at the time of booking that not all the seating was tiered so we found ourselves in the second row with some of our view obscured due to being on the same level as the row in front.  Will definitely keep that in mind for the future!

Upon reaching our seats, we were greeted by two notices: one from the playwright expressing his disgust disappointment in the director's decision to ignore his direction for the final scene; and the second from the producers in support of the director.  Pity.  Hard not to allow such a childish public display of behind-the-scenes bickering to affect one's theatre experience.

All that aside, the play was well written and brilliantly acted.  And whilst the final scene perhaps lacked the raw intensity the playwright had intended, knowing how it should have been delivered, the impact was there.  Albeit, somewhat watered down.

We laughed, we nodded in recognition, we shook our heads in disappointment, we laughed (even snorted!?!) some more, and in the end we sat in stunned silence.

Moved through a variety of emotions with an abundance of food for thought.

Theatre at it's stunning best.